VIKUITI BRIGHTNESS ENHANCEMENT FILM

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In the following screenshots, the detector shows the results of tracing 1 million rays. A single object is replicated on an x,y,z grid. Neither of these are essential, but they are very useful, and very powerful features to enhance the study of illumination systems. In this case the backing object is object number 1 in the NSC editor. It also shows just how efficient the Array object is in both memory usage and ray-tracing speed: Summary The Array object capability in Zemax is ideal for modeling microreplicated arrays like Brightness Enhancement Film. Since we define these by the half-heights, we can just pick up these parameters, and multiply by two to define the x and y separations between the prisms. Note that if you increase the size of the BEF to a few mm square, Zemax will stop drawing the array and replace it with a bounding box instead.

This article describes how to model brightness enhancement film in Zemax. Also the ability to automatically replace the prism array with a bounding box allows fast on-screen manipulation of the object. They can be easily added to the Zemax model if needed. It is convenient to use the x and y thickness parameters of the backing sheet to define the size of the piece of film used. Here is the illuminance spatial distribution of power seen on the detector. Non Sequential Ray Tracing. Also, ray-tracing speed is largely unaffected by the size of the array. Its worth playing with at this point to understand how the 3 defining parameters:

How To Model Brightness Enhancement Film

The draw limit is easily controlled from the user interface to give the exact level of control required fro any given application. Here is an example of the ray-tracing in the BEF: A single object is replicated on an x,y,z grid.

In this case, we will only need the x,y grid. Polarization and Thin Film Coatings. Because of how this object is implemented in Zemax, an array of any size can be created without using more memory than the original parent object.

It is therefore used in many different sizes. Viiuiti detector object was also been defined. It has X and Y half-widths defined by its parameter 1 and 2 columns. Also the ability to automatically replace the prism array with a bounding box allows fast on-screen manipulation of the object.

The entire BEF can by dynamically regenerated easily with just these parameters.

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Zemax OpticStudio Knowledgebase – Zemax

So at this point, the prism shown below is actually the array object, set to produce a 1 x 1 array of prisms: The array object’s own properties allow you to define the number of replications in x, y and z, and the distances between replications in x, y and z. This object has as its parent object the prism object, and it is positioned exactly co-located with it.

It is convenient to use the x and y thickness parameters of the backing sheet to define the size of the piece of film used. We will then fill the film with as many prisms as are required.

In comparison, if the array object is set to ‘rays ignore this object’ so that there is no prismatic structure, the ray-trace is as follows: Here is the illuminance spatial distribution of power seen on the detector. In the following screenshots, the detector shows the results of tracing 1 million rays. Glass and Refractive Index. Note that the array object inherits all its shape, refractive, diffractive, gradient index etc properties from the parent, except ‘rays ignore’ and ‘do not draw’.

They can be easily added to the Zemax model if needed. From the manufacturer’s datasheet, the nominal film properties are: In this case the backing object is object number 1 in the NSC editor.

Neither of these are essential, but they are very useful, and very powerful features to enhance the study of illumination systems. BEF uses a microreplicated prismatic structure to control the exit angle of the light. Again, note that this is just a simple file demonstrating the optical performance of the BEF array, and is not a model of a full LCD device. Since we define these by the half-heights, we can just pick up these parameters, and multiply by two to define the x and y separations between the prisms.

Pickup from parameter 1 enforces this condition. Pick-up solves allow this to be done automatically, giving: Here for example is a 4×3 array of prisms: Zemax counts the number of triangles needed to draw the array, and if this exceeds the limit set in the ‘Draw Limit’ parameter, Zemax will not draw the array.

This aspect ratio looks a little different to what is usually drawn for a BEF: More details can be found here. Its worth playing with at this point to understand how the 3 defining parameters: Also, ray-tracing speed is largely unaffected by the size of the array.

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This would be extremely unweildy to model any other way. Exploring the Zemax Demo. As we do not need the parent object for ray-tracing, its ‘rays ignore this object’ and ‘do not draw this object’ settings are selected on, so that all ray-tracing is done with the array object.

The use of pick-up solves locks the three objects togetherr, so a BEF film of any size can be produced quickly and easily. A source object was been placed inside the BEF, at the top of one side. Quickly locate KB articles based on specific search terms or phrases. These are direclty linked to the defining parameters by pick-up solves.

Search is exclusively for the Knowledge Base. This models the prism perfectly, but it ignores the substrate of the film. The source was set to a nominal 1 Lumen output power: In this case, just three objects are needed to define a BEF film of arbitrary size.

This is a very elegant demonstration of the power of Zemax’s parametric-driven editors. Summary The Array object capability in Zemax is ideal for modeling microreplicated arrays like Brightness Enhancement Film. In this schematic diagram, rays from the source may undergo multiple total internal reflections, before emerging at close to on-axis angles with respect to the viewer.

X-halfwidth of the backing material Y-halfwidth of the backing material X1-halfwidth of the prism control all aspects of geometry the BEF. This article describes how to model brightness enhancement film in Zemax. Note that if you increase the size of the BEF to a few mm square, Zemax will stop drawing the array and replace it with a bounding box instead. As will be seen in this example, Zemax handles this with little extra memory requirement and very fast ray-tracing speeds, thanks to the internal architecture of the array object.

In the absense of the prismatic strucure, little light escapes the plastic sheet, as shown above, but when the prism structure is turned on, we get: The luminous intensity angular distribution of power is The peak luminous intensity of 0.